4. iPad to Vector

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One of the things Procreate doesn?t do is allow you to create vectors of your lettering. Instead, what Procreate produces are raster images ? images made up from a grid of pixels. Most of the images you see on the web fall into this category ? common file types for raster images are JPEG, GIF and PNG. The limitation of working with raster images is that because they are composed of a fixed number of pixels they can only be enlarged to a certain extent before becoming grainy or pixelated.
Vector images, however, are made up of points and paths, with common file types being EPS and AI. Anything that is likely to need resizing, such as a logo, should be created as a vector. So this bonus module will cover the steps necessary to move into Illustrator and create vectors as well as help you understand when this type of process is necessary.

Raster Images : The images that we’ve been creating in Procreate are raster images ? images made up from a grid of pixels. Most of the images you see on the web fall into this category ? common file types for raster images are JPEG, GIF and PNG. PNG files allow for transparent backgrounds, JPEGs do not. The limitation of working with raster images is that because they are composed of a fixed number of pixels they can only be enlarged to a certain extent before becoming grainy, pixelated. How much they can be enlarged depends on the resolution of the image to start with.

Vector Images : Vector images are made up of points and paths, with common file types being EPS and AI. Anything that is likely to need resizing, such as a logo, should be created as a vector ? it can be created in specific sizes as a raster image at a later date, but the original should always be a vector. I use Illustrator to create vectors from lettering that I’ve done in Procreate. There are two ways to do this in Illustrator:

Image Trace : This is the “quick and dirty” option – it takes only a few clicks to create a vector, by importing a png or jpg file and then allowing Illustrator to interpret the file and create anchor points and handles for you. To get a fairly accurate shape, Illustrator is likely to add many, many anchor points, making it difficult to do any further editing on your curves. This is generally seen as the inferior option by most who work in this space. I am a little more pragmatic about all of these things though, and feel like if the end result is adequate for the project you’re working on, go with that option. It’s also going to take an awfully long time to do a long lettering piece using the second option.

Pen Tool : This is the ‘gold standard’ of creating vectors. You import your Procreate lettering into Illustrator the same as above, but then trace over each letter creating the curves using anchors and handles. Takes a heap longer, but gives you much cleaner curves and vectors that will scale well at any size without weird bumps where Illustrator has made errors.

 

These are the settings for the saved presets mentioned in the video: Presets